Bass Whoppers

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DanWarme
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Bass Whoppers

Postby DanWarme » Tue May 28, 2019 10:28 pm

Thought I would maybe start a conversation on one of my favorite / hated topics. Whoppers of lies told about bass, and bass fishing or maybe more correctly myths of bass fishing. So many of them around, most being treated as gospel truth, mostly because they keep being repeated when just a little logic and thought will show how wrong they are.
Here are some of my most hated myths that should just go away instead of being repeated:

1. Bass have a preferred temperature range of water that they like to be in.

2. Bass are cold blooded, so they don't have hearts. (Still remember the Sunday school teacher who told me that one when I was 10)

3. Bass don't have eyelids. That's why you'll always find them hiding in the shade.

And probably the one that gets my ire up the most.
4. High barometric pressure affects (or is detected by) a bass's swim bladder, making the bass shut down and get lethargic which is why cold fronts shut down the bite.

Any myths you feel like disparaging?
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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby JoeLanghans » Wed May 29, 2019 3:58 am

Wait, I’m confused... how do you know for sure that these are all myths. 2 of the 4 mentioned are not myths. :roll:

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby mark poulson » Wed May 29, 2019 1:41 pm

JoeLanghans wrote:Wait, I’m confused... how do you know for sure that these are all myths. 2 of the 4 mentioned are not myths. :roll:

Which two?
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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby ash » Wed May 29, 2019 1:54 pm

1. Bass have a preferred temperature range of water that they like to be in. - I think this is not a myth Bass thrive in water from 72 - 82 degrees. I think more to the point is not just temperature but food availability and D.O. levels. But bass will boogie to warmer structure during a cold front - thats why wood is king, then rock then steel as they all retain heat differently.

MYTH 2: BASS PREFER WATER TEMPERATURES OF 70 TO 72 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT.

Fact: Largemouth bass prefer temperatures of 82 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit, smallmouth a couple degrees cooler. But what does prefer mean? Everything else being equal, this is the temperature they occupy if available. However, bass function quite well from 39 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby JoeLanghans » Wed May 29, 2019 5:44 pm

mark poulson wrote:
JoeLanghans wrote:Wait, I’m confused... how do you know for sure that these are all myths. 2 of the 4 mentioned are not myths. :roll:

Which two?

Bass do have a preferred water temp like ash said and they are affected by barometric pressure.

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby DanWarme » Wed May 29, 2019 7:17 pm

Bass do not have a "preferred temperature" at all.
Being a cold blooded creature, they are the same temp as the water they are in. They may sense they have moved into cooler water, but that temperature difference quickly disappears as their bodies take on the new temperature of the water they are in.

Bass DO have a temperature range where their metabolism is the highest (ie: they have to eat the most because their system is burning up the calories the fastest) In general, the warmer the water, the more active they become, the more food they require and the more often they feed. However, as water warms into the mid 80's the reverse happens and bass become more lethargic. High water temps can become lethal though that can be more due to the fact that the oxygen content of the water drops at such temps.

Saying bass have a prefered temperature range is saying they are like people who feel chilled walking into a 65 degree room and turn up the heat to feel more comfortable. A bass has no preference for the temperature of the water it is in. It will be in what ever water that provides it with safety, oxygen, and food. Finding bass in warmer water in the spring is more a factor of the bass that are in that warmer water are more active and more likely to bite. It does not mean bass from 5 miles around have searched out that warm water spot.
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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby DanWarme » Wed May 29, 2019 11:12 pm

With regards to bass being affected by barometric pressure on their swim bladder. Ridiculous. Here's why.

Water is 784 times more dense than air at sea level. Which means bass are affected far more by a slight change in depth of water and its change in pressure than they would ever be affected by the most extreme changes in barometric pressure. For the mathematically inclined, here are some numbers.

1 atmosphere of pressure or "ATM" (at sea level) = 14.7 psi of pressure. 1013.25 mbar for those with a real barometer.
In water, that same 1 ATM or 14.7 PSI is found at a depth of 33.8' in fresh water.
In other words, the several miles of atmosphere above us presses down with the same average pressure as 33.8' worth of water. Clear so far? 1 ATM of Air (several miles deep) = 33.8' of fresh water = 14.7 PSI

The highest sea level barometric pressure recorded was 1.069 ATM. roughly a 7% increase above the normal average air pressure.
The Lowest sea level barometric pressure recorded was in a hurricane, at .859 ATM, slightly more than a 14% drop from the normal average. I got both figures from a google search. Your mileage may vary but the principle and reality of air pressure / water pressure are what is important here. Understand the underlying concept to see the reality of the situation. One of the biggest concepts here is that changes in air pressure are very minute when compared with changes in depth of water.

Since high pressure (cold fronts) shut down the bite, lets see what kind of a depth change is required to equal the worst high pressure system ever recorded which was 7% above the normal average of 1 ATM.
Using the water standard of 33.8' ( I'll round it up to 34' for simplicity) a change of 7% in depth would approximate a 7% change in pressure.
34' x .07 = 2.38'. So if a bass swam from the surface down into a depth of 2.5', it would be subjected to a greater degree of pressure change than the worst High barometric pressure (ie cold front) ever recorded.

Does it make any sense at all that air pressure would affect a bass to such a negative extent if sinking only 2 feet deeper into the water would produce similar pressure changes??? Sink 2 feet and feel the same affects as the worst cold front of all time. The answer you're looking for is NO!

This is a case of attributing the wrong factors to bass behavior. Changes in air pressure are not detected by the bass and their swim bladder and air pressure changes do not affect bass.

HOWEVER,
the EFFECTS of the changes in air pressure do have an effect on bass. The distinction is important. It is the affect changes in barometric pressure has on a whole host of factors that cause the bass to react. Not the change in the pressure itself.

Changes in barometric pressure are what create our weather. Air moves from high pressure areas to low pressure areas. This is what causes wind. Pretty easy to understand. Low pressure areas have storms, or at least cloudy conditions, higher humidity and generally a better bite. High pressure areas have high clear skies, lower humidity and typically the bite stinks. However, it clearly is not the pressure change that is affecting the bass as we have seen in the numbers above.

So what is the cause of high pressure systems shutting down the bite? No one has a definite answer, and there probably is no single reason, but the best explanations I have heard from some respectable sources include the following.

Dee Thomas told me he believed it had to do with changes in light levels. There is definitely evidence to support this. Low pressure areas have lower UV light levels as well as generally higher amounts of cloud cover. Low light levels = improved feeding conditions for bass. A bass's eye sight adapts faster to changing light levels than the things it feeds one. This is why the "morning bite" is such a constant where ever you go and what ever type of water, conditions or season you fish for bass.

The late, Bill Murphy out of San Diego believed that the bass were simply full. After going on a feed during the previous low pressure system, They were not hungry any more and were just sitting back and digesting. Simple and logical.

Other possibilities include the affect that light, wind, rain, etc. has on the food chain. Insects, algae, plankton and zooplankton are all affected by light levels which are affected by atmospheric pressure. When the foundation of the food chain gets impacted, the rest of the chain responds accordingly. If the food for the shad and the bluegills gets scarce, it stands to reason that the shad and bluegills shut down and hide. Bass don't normally expend lots of energy looking for a meal when it is hard to find. They shut down and wait for the feeding opportunities to improve as well.
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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby ash » Thu May 30, 2019 1:24 pm

Great discussions!

DW im with you and Dee i think high pressure typically results in bluebird days which lends itself to no cloud cover, no breeze and the fish IMHO are much more on alert. IE if you see the fish they arent going to bite as they have already sensed you and something is wrong. Where as on a windy or cloudy day they feel more protected and are in much more of a hunting mode vs neutral to negative.

These fish will move 30' vertically to crush my spook - and i've seen schoals move from dirt shallow to 80' in a matter of hours that's a lot more stress on their swim bladder then a sunny day.

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby W.C » Sat Jun 01, 2019 8:52 pm

Wow! This was a awesome read! Got me hungry just trying to take it all in :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby Patriot One » Sun Jun 02, 2019 5:56 am

since I have those same feeding habits I have to agree with bill murphy

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby DanWarme » Mon Jun 03, 2019 1:29 pm

A couple of other whoppers I'll throw in.
5. Bass are line shy. You need light line to get bit in clear water.

6. You'll get bit better on green line than clear. Flourecent line and colored lines scare fish big time.
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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby Viking » Mon Jun 03, 2019 2:29 pm

Totally agree. Line shy myth is a figment of SoCal imagination. Get bit on equal level on 17lb line with a jig in crystal clear Casitas, Pyramid or Castaic as a guy drop shottin pound line. Also slot less heartbreak after setting the hook. Another myth in my opinion is the whole "downsizing" thing around here, especially bluebird, post cold front. People say you have to drag that little Reaper or Wham Fishy around on 4lb to get a bite in that situation and I've never found that to be true in 40+ years. It's all in where your confidence lies and what you'll fall back on every time. I promise they bite a full size Creature bait on 17lb in gin clear water just as well

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby ash » Mon Jun 03, 2019 3:29 pm

Viking wrote:Totally agree. Line shy myth is a figment of SoCal imagination. Get bit on equal level on 17lb line with a jig in crystal clear Casitas, Pyramid or Castaic as a guy drop shottin pound line. Also slot less heartbreak after setting the hook. Another myth in my opinion is the whole "downsizing" thing around here, especially bluebird, post cold front. People say you have to drag that little Reaper or Wham Fishy around on 4lb to get a bite in that situation and I've never found that to be true in 40+ years. It's all in where your confidence lies and what you'll fall back on every time. I promise they bite a full size Creature bait on 17lb in gin clear water just as well


Having cut my teeth on these waters ill concede that 15lb was my line of choice with a jig but i would split shot or drop shot with 6lb - and still do a ton in Norcal. But man you brought back some memories with the Reapers or Wham fishies are guys still using em :shock:

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby Viking » Mon Jun 03, 2019 4:23 pm

Viking wrote:Totally agree. Line shy myth is a figment of SoCal imagination. Get bit on equal level on 17lb line with a jig in crystal clear Casitas, Pyramid or Castaic as a guy drop shottin 4 pound line. Also alot less heartbreak after setting the hook. Another myth in my opinion is the whole "downsizing" thing around here, especially bluebird, post cold front. People say you have to drag that little Reaper or Wham Fishy around on 4lb to get a bite in that situation and I've never found that to be true in 40+ years. It's all in where your confidence lies and what you'll fall back on every time. I promise they bite a full size Creature bait on 17lb in gin clear water just as well

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby DanWarme » Mon Jun 03, 2019 6:20 pm

With regards to line size, here's my take on it though there is less science behind my view on this one.
It's not about the bass seeing the line, it is all about how the line makes your bait act. Line size can have a huge affect on the presentation which contributes to bass eating your bait.
For instance, crankbait fisherman have known for years that smaller line size equals a deeper running crank bait. Vice versa, heavier line can help keep your crank up (say out of the grass) if that is the need. Larger line size means more resistance in the water, ie: drag.
I got on a great bite one winter fishing a 2 1/2" tube in 50' of water. The only rub is the fish wanted a slow fall so I had to use a 1/16 oz jig head. Anything bigger and they didn't want it. The other requirement is that I had to fish it on 6# test. The reason is a heavier line presented a lot more drag. That light head would have had a very hard time pulling a heavier line down AND the line would be too easy to bow and drift, resulting in my losing contact with the bait. The bass might have been biting it on 12# test line, but it wouldn't do me any good if I couldn't detect the strike!
IMO, THAT is the big reason for going with light lines in finesse situations. The line balances out with the size of the lures and sinkers. While I've never tried it, I would venture to say that fishing a 2" reaper on 20# test and a 1 oz egg sinker is possible. The sinker would work well with that diameter of line and allow you to stay in contact with the bait. However, the heavy sinker would make that reaper look wrong by plummeting to the bottom, and would certainly feel wrong to the fish if they tried to swim off with it.

With regards to line color. This for me is more anecdotal evidence as opposed to rock solid data, but here is my take on it.
1. Green line will get bit more often and more consistently than clear line. I am convinced of that from my own experiments throughout the years.
However, getting bit is only part of the story. What counts is the number of fish in the boat at the end of the day. And how you are fishing and presenting the bait has everything to do with whether the bass are going to bite or not. So, I have a modification to #1.
2. Green line will get you bit more often and put more fish in the boat IF you are fishing a technique where you FEEL the bite. Think splitshotting. Dragging a little worm around, you have to stay in contact with the bait. The best splitshotters can feel that bait slide over a water flea in 50' of water. For them green line is a god send.
3. If you are fishing a fall bait, ie: jig, tube, senko... anything that you have to watch your line to detect the strike, that green line is going to work against you. Particularly if you are an older angler. (guilty) The eyes just can't detect that line anymore and the smaller the line size the worse it gets. Watching your line is a given if you live on the delta. If you have any success at all on the delta, watching your line is second nature. But if you are used to fishing "deep water", (at castaic, anything less than 20' deep is shallow) most guys are fishing by feel dragging that little worm around. I was guilty of not watching my line for years till I wised up. By not watching your line, you are missing fish! Guaranteed!
Fishing a line that is easy to see, allows you to detect more strikes and boat more fish. You might get bit more often with a green line, but it doesn't do you any good if you don't know you are bit. 5 bites you know and set the hook = 5 fish in the boat. 10 bites that you never detect = 0 fish in the boat.
So for me, the guideline I use is, fishing by feel, I'll go with a green line. For techniques that require line watching I'll go with a clear or easier to see line. And if need be, hitting that line with a magic marker to break up the line into light and dark segments can be a great way to have the best of both worlds. Provided of course you don't use a marker with ink that breaks down your line and weakens it!
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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby ash » Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:54 pm

DW - have you played with small diameter braids and leaders? I can throw a pink or white 10lb braid on 6lb fluro and feel those damn flees finally without killing the action and while being able to watch my line! Technology has changed a bunch since the days of draggin all day - but the fish havent really evolved as fast as most fishing products :lol:

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby DanWarme » Wed Jun 12, 2019 10:25 pm

Ash
I do use braided lines at times, but I've yet to become a convert to them - for a lot of reasons. Among the biggest for me are:
Back lashed are a real pain to get out. Or when you bear down trying to pull out a hung up lure and the line buries deep into the spool.
Can't tell you the number of big baits I've snapped off and lost to the depths or the banks because the sudden stop of a backlash. Didn't take losing but a couple Castaic Trout baits to make up my mind on that one. Almost never happens to me with mono or flouro.
While braid improves sensitivity in some cases, it kills it for me at other times with the added friction going through the guides. Makes the blank vibrate in a way mono never does.
Come close to busting a wrist time and again when setting on a rock or a log instead of a fish. Or cutting myself because I had the line across a finger when I set. Man does that hurt. lol Then there is the fact of busting a rod in that situation.... Hurts the pocket book.
That small diameter line gets a whole lot harder to see when trying to tie knots, get out tangles, etc.
Then there are all the times that line has gotten into the split ring on my blade or crank.

I realize that a lot of these things are just variables I could adjust my technique so they no longer bother me. But old dogs... you know. I actually do fish braid more and more at certain times, primarily when I fish the delta. It is definitely on my punchin' rods and frog rods and some, but not all of my flipping rods. I've started throwing more blades on it but it is a mixed blessing. Braid fouls in the baits a lot more, but the hook-ups are more solid. If I am having to make long casts like fishing grass in clear water, I think braid is probably a better bet for me, and I'll put up with the fouling to get better hooksets. But if I am in dirty water and the casts are a lot shorter, mono stretch becomes less a hinderance. So I'll enjoy less wasted time unfouling a bait.

One other factor is I started using braid when it first came out over 25 years ago. I was much younger and a lot faster. I think the added sensitivity caused me to pull the bait away from fish at times so I missed fish or had them lightly hooked. As I have aged and am slowing down, some of that is probably no longer a factor and previous opinions and past experiences may not be valid for me anymore.

I have not used the braid / leader combo much so the jury is still out for me. Where I have used it most is on a carolina rig. I do need to experiment more with it. But I will say, the issues of having to tie extra knots, and that knot hitting through the guides every cast creates another potential point of failure. Still, I haven't worked with it enough yet to determine if it is an improvement or a fad I can do without. One of the problems of not getting out on the water as often as I used to do.

I was a much better fishingman when I was doing 100+ days on the water a year. Weird why that should be a factor. lol
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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby WRB » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:36 am

Hi Dan,
Good topic and discussion.
Bass are bass or are they? Black bass family has more then 1 species and we tend to lump all bass under the Largemouth label,the fact is in California all our are transplants from other regions including Spotted bass (2 strians), Largemouth bass ( 2 strains), and Smallmouth bass to name the 3 most popular. Bass are not bass they belong to the sunfish family. Each specie and strian has different water temperature preferences with the Florida strian Largemouth bass having very low tolerance to water temps under 45 degrees F limiting their range. Northern strain LMB and Smallmouth can tolerate water temps down to 38 degrees, colder the DO levels start to get to high.
The bass airbladder has 1 function to neutralize it's body weight allowing the fish to suspend, no nerves in the bladder to detect external pressure changes.
When FLMB were 1st introduced the myth was they rarely strike lures, live bait was the way to catch them. This may have been do to FLMB transplanted in deep SoCal rocky structure lakes were less aggressive feeders preferring larger size prey source then NLMB. Hand poured soft plastic worms changed how we fished for FLMB successfully and still the most popular lure today.
Another myth is giant FLMB are lazy fat slow fish, not true. This myth may come from big females being caught off bed, all female bed bass fight less aggressively.
Having caught my share of giant bass during pre spawn there is nothing lazy about a big bass jumping completely out the water or making hard freight train runs.
Bass can't see Fluorocarbon line is a myth, they are not line shy fish FC makes no difference to bass. Linecdiameter impacts how lure perform and that affects how bass react to lures far more then low light refraction.
Why todays bass anglers use braid with FC leaders may be the belief they feel strikes better because braids small dia with low stretch and believing FC being invisiable and having low stretch helps strike detection. FC stretches the same % uber load as premium a mono line, no advantage regarding stretch. FC does have very low coeffient of drag in water verses mono having higher drag coeffient, plus FC is heavier than Nylon mono line, equals less bow in the line underwater between the lure and rod tip. Less drag and less line bow equals better line movement detection, how this is a advantage using a short length of leader is questionable. What ins't questionable is FC has lower knot strength, 2 knots can fail 100% more then 1 knot and for that reason I never use a leader with braid for bass fishing.
Tom

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby DanWarme » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:56 pm

Great Stuff Tom!

Will add a couple of points. Flourocarbon lines exhibit lower knot strength because they suffer greatly from the friction when tightening your knots. I fished some FC lines from a sponsor when they first started hitting the market and the knot strength was worse than pathetic. Learned that you MUST wet the knot to lubricate it, and also cinch it down slowly. That helped a lot!

As far as the fighting abilities of Floridas vs Northern strain, I think there are a lot of factors involved, over and above the genetic strain. Since you no doubt have experience with both lakes and big bass I'll ask. Have you found the big bass at Casitas in general fight a hell of a lot harder than the bass in Castaic? That has been my observation and opinion, but it is anecdotal for the most part. No science to back it up. I will say that bass living in current fight a lot harder. Rivers, tide waters, either way, they will kick butt out of a still water bass.
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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby mark poulson » Fri Jun 14, 2019 6:42 am

I fish braid a lot, because I fish only the Delta now.
I have gone to braid with a 20# leader, with an improved Albright knot, for my spinnerbaits, cranks, and treble hooked top water baits, to stop fouling the braid in the hooks and split rings. 100% improvement.
I use 20# fluoro for blades, and 20# mono for cranks and top water.
I no longer have the lip ripping hookset speed I had when I was younger, so braid, even with a short 36" leader, helps me get a solid hookset.
So, for me, braid has given me a better chance to get fish into the boat.
I lose far fewer fish now because of poor hook penetration, but I still boat swing most of my fish so I can keep the pressure on the hook in the fish's mouth. Especially with spinnerbaits, which have a big hook, every few fish I'll have the blade fall out of it's mouth in the boat because the hook was caught behind a bony part of the mouth instead of penetrating.
I've lost many more fish at the boat, trying to net them, than by swinging them in.
I find that fluoro is more dense than mono, so it telegraphs a "tick" bite on a slack line, which I never felt with mono or braid, even with the line over my finger. When I fished the Ika down south, which is a slack line bait, I'd use straight 12# fluoro. I'd feel a tick, count to three to let the fish get the bait completely into it's mouth, and then swing.
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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby WRB » Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:45 am

Sticking to the myth theme FC stretches less then mono is true or false. Both mono (Nylon monofilament and blended Nylon copolymers) have nearly the same yeild strength, point force applied to stretch the line. If we use 33% as a value where FC and mono starts to stretch or 1/3rd the line ultimate strength or it's labeled # test we can understand line stretch. 1/3rd the line strength is a low value; 12# test is 4 lbs. 4 lbs doesn't seem like much force until you apply it to a 4 power or medium heavy bass rod, it comes close to fully loading the rod bottoming it out.
What I believe anglers feel as line stretch is pulling the line bow under water tight. Fluorocarbon line has very little line bow underwater. I first noticed the line drag difference when running line behind my boat to untwist it. Mono creates a lot of pulling force as you drag it slowly behind the boat and when turn the line stays in the wake. FC has less pulling resistance the mono and when turning cuts across the wake. Less coeffient of drag feels like less line stretch and that is all that matters, how we feel what is going on at the end of the line.
More knots have been reinvented and renamed by anglers using FC then any other line in fishing history. Why so many knots? The answer is obvious FC has lower knot stretch then any other line in history. The physical property that most affects knot strength is notch strength followed by impact strength.Notch is just that a deformation like a flat spot, FC has low notch strength compared to mono. Impact strength happens during hook sets, very fast load applied. Again FC has lower impact strength then mono. Tieing knots can create flat spots, hook barbs hitting the line can nick it and rocks etc abraid it. Bottom line FC gives us better contact feel with underwater lures and lower knot strength per (psi) or line diameter then mono.
Answer; mono feels like it stretches.
Tom

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby WRB » Fri Jun 14, 2019 10:20 am

Dan, to answer your question regarding fighting difference between Casitas and Castiac and keeping in the myth theme that big bass are lazy fat trout eating fish.
My experience during the 80's $ 90's when both lakes were in their prime I would give Castiac having more aggressive big bass that were easier for me to catch and tended to be shallow water fish then Casitas bass. Deeper water bass between 25'-35' depths fight differently then shallower water bass between 25'-20'depths. Shallower big bass tend to jump where deeper bass tend to run looking for something break the line. Seeing a big bass jump out of the water is heart stopping and that was more likely at Casitas. IMO big bass in both lakes fought the same when caught on the same lures. I would give Castiac the edge at night because of thier more aggressive behavior.
Catching big bass on heavy swimbait tackle using big swimbaits you simply over power the bass.
Catching big bass on standard bass tackle using 10-12 lb you must control the bass by fighting it.
I caught far more big bass at Castiac using standard tackle on jigs then Casitas, they were all hard fighting fish.
Tom

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Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby mark poulson » Fri Jun 14, 2019 10:31 am

Tom,
I have to yield to your superior knowledge when it comes to mono and fluoro stretch.
I just had way more feel with fluoro. I guess the lack of line belly could explain it.
Now, I use it for my leaders when I'm fishing blades through tules, because it holds up really well.
I wet my knots as I'm cinching them down slowly, and pull on them really hard to be sure they're good before I make a cast.
Better to have a knot fail in the boat than at the boat.
Attitude plus effort equal success

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WRB
Posts: 487
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2015 8:47 pm
Location: Simi Valley

Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby WRB » Fri Jun 14, 2019 3:37 pm

Mark, when fished SoCal my guess is you didn't use 20# FC line during day light unless chucking big swimbaits. Finesse bass started in SoCal lakes by anglers wanting to catch a limit of bass after the FLMB became established. If you fished tournaments and wanted to be competitive with Dick Trask, Zank or Iovino back in the 80's light 5 to 6 lb Max Ultra Green coploy was the go line. If you could get bit with 8# at Casitas or Castaic it was considered heavy line.
I was fishing with jigs during that time period using 10# Big Game and everyone thought I was nuts, big bass were too wary to bite 10# line!
When Aaron Martens started using Sunline Shooter FC and winning tournaments the TX guys all followed suit but kept using the same diameter line, .009 to .010D. The knot strength problem soon started. 80% knot strength is 20% less then 100% mono/coploy lines offer using properly tied knots.
The knot wars started as a result and haven't stopped. Berkeley solved the FC knot strength by going up in diameter without changing the labeled # test and others followed. Seagaur and Sunline stayed with their original pound test per smaller diameter because it offers better feel and performance with finesse size soft plastic plus cast better using spinning tackle. Knot strength is still an issue.
Enter the braid with leader era. Spinning reels using small diameter braid reduces line twist issue and larger diameter FC leaders reduces knot failures and that is where the majority of bass anglers are today.
Me, 2 knots using 10 to 12 lb FC doesn't work as good as 1 knot targeting big bass. Spinning I have stayed with 5 lb Max UG, all my other lines are Sunline Defier Armillo Nylon, 11 lb for cranks and top water, 25 lb for swimbait, glides, wakes, rats etc.jigs and T-rigs I still use Shooter or Tatsu 10-12# FC daytime and 19# Armillo at night.
Drifted off topic but it comes under bass are line shy myth, Except fishing Castiac or Castias during day light hours.
The Delta it's 60# Finns braid for heavy cover I rarely get the chance to fish.
Tom

DanWarme
Posts: 381
Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2006 9:26 am
Location: Van Nuys
Contact:

Re: Bass Whoppers

Postby DanWarme » Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:29 pm

Just as an observation, Guys like Aaron, Zank, and Dick Trask would outfish most of the tournament field any day / everyday if you gave them nothing but 1940's era black dacron line to fish with. :)
Skill and talent beat out line size every time. Not to mention bait, color, size.....
DW

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